Posts Tagged ‘recipes’

Fresh Tuna Salad with Capers, Cilantro and Lime

 

Fresh Tuna Salad with Capers, Cilantro and Lime

Fresh Tuna Salad with Capers, Cilantro and Lime

Canned tuna is always in my pantry, and it will do in a pinch, but for a change, try making Tuna Salad from fresh, wild caught tuna.  It doesn’t taste as strong, and is a nice change from the usual fare. Also, you can add a lot of finely chopped vegetables to the mix — a meal in one can be a handy thing! — and you can use almost any vegetable YOU like.  I’ve been known to put carrots, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, red cabbage, and so on in my tuna salad.  Make sure you get enough “crunch” in there. Here is one very simple and tasty combination:
Wild Ahi Tuna, Steamed, about 4-6 oz.
1 – 2 T. capers or to taste.
1-2 T. chopped red onion, or to taste
1/4 c. chopped cilantro, or to taste
1/4 c. chopped celery
juice from 1/2 lime, or more
Vegenaise (or your favorite mayonnaise) — enough to make the salad hang together.
Mix and enjoy.

You’ll find you can enjoy Fresh Tuna Salad with Capers, Cilantro and Lime any season of the year!

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Fresh Raspberries with Drizzled Honey Threads

Fresh Raspberries with Drizzled Honey Threads

Fresh Raspberries with Drizzled Honey Threads

It’s late in the season for berries, but there’s always that last hurrah.  I see them in the store or on somebody’s roadside stand, and I just can’t help myself.  I know they are less sweet than summer berries, but they are too beautiful, too red, and visions of sugarplums begin to dance in my head — plump berries in a glass bowl, drizzled with heavy cream. It’s all too much for the food senses! On one recent exploratory trip through apple country on a stunning Fall Sunday afternoon, with fruit and vegetable stands everywhere, beckoning loudly, I stopped to see what everyone had.  I like looking at all the produce and imagining what I’d do with it. Sometimes I ask other shoppers what they are going to do with , say, that BUSHEL of green cabbage they are hauling to their truck.  A very happy couple with a work horse of a pick-up truck said they were going to make a lot of slaw and chow-chow (which I had never heard of until I moved to North Carolina.)  Apparently, it’s a kind sweet relish made with — cabbage — of course.  I have yet to taste it, but that couple was surely going to make gallons of it. The cabbages led to the honey…. So there I was looking at all these green cabbages and striking up conversations about slaw and such, when what to my wondering eyes should appear, but jars and jars of honey.  I didn’t even begin to know what to buy, so I asked the clerk about it.  She said, “Oh, honey.  Follow me.” And I did. She handed me a jar of Smoky Mountain Sourwood honey and said confidently with her southern farm girl draw, “This here is the best honey I have.  It still has the comb in it, and it’s the most delicious honey.  It makes all difference to leave the honeycomb in the jar. ” When I asked her about consuming the honeycomb, she went on to say that they grew up poor and didn’t have chewing gum, so they used to chew honeycomb instead.  She told me I could eat it or chew it, but the big difference was the taste of the honey.  And she assured me that honey had never been heated. Well, that story worked just fine for me.  I believed her and bought it immediately. I took it home.  I opened the jar and tasted it. I thought I was gonna die.  Of bliss.  Who knew honey could be so good???  Suddenly, I felt rather silly for EVER buying any other kind of honey. And then out of the refrigerator floated the red raspberries.   They heard the call of the honey.   I washed them gently, and then took a sharp knife (you’ll see why in a minute) and put the clean sharp tip down into the honey.  The honey fell from the sharp tip in microscopic threads over the cool, wet berries. I didn’t expect the honey to stay in threads and droplets once it fell on the raspberries, but it did.  I guess the berries were cold enough to keep the honey in place.  It was gorgeous. I think it took a half hour to eat a small bowl, I ate them so slowly, savoring all the tastes and textures.  If you have any late season, ever so slightly tart raspberries, falling under the spell of a little Sourwood Honey from Granny’s Roadside Stand could be a very good thing! And then there’s tomorrow’s breakfast… Continue Reading

Whole Grain Pancakes

   

Whole Grain Pancakes

  Whole Grain Pancakes

I confess, I go a little overboard on Sunday mornings when it comes to making breakfast. I don’t know why. I get excited about trying something new, or going to greater lengths to make something that sounds really, really good and if it takes a little more time than normal, that’s OK.  There’s a certain luxury about Sunday mornings.  

Vita-Mix

  This morning all I could think about was pancakes. Let me begin by confessing that I make my own pancake flour.  It’s not that hard.  You do need the right equipment, which can be initially costly, but once you have it, you have it, and you can play to your heart’s content, and we’re talking way more than just grinding flour.  Good equipment is worth a lot to a kitchen nerd! So a very long time ago, I bought a Vita-Mix.  You can do just about anything with a Vita-Mix, including grind flour.  The ingredients of my flour varies according to what I have on hand.  Today’s flour was made up of whole spelt, sunflower seeds, and whole millet. But don’t worry, you don’t have to make your own flour.  There are plenty of “already ground” options in health food stores.  Rows and rows, actually.  Keep opened packages in the frig. I also went to the trouble of making my own breakfast sausage this morning!!  See what I mean?  I go a little overboard. Starting with roast chicken and a minor hint of garlic that I had on hand, I added allspice and onion.  One usually makes sausage with raw meat, but since I didn’t have that, I gave this other way (using cooked meat) a whirl. The texture was a little odd, but the taste was great, and we both enjoyed having protein with the pancakes.  I’ll be trying more ways of making my own sausages! Anyway, in case you’re not in to grinding flour or experimenting with sausage recipes, I’ve included a reasonable Whole Grain Pancake recipe here.  As we speak, you’re probably headed out the door to have someone make Sunday brunch for you and how smart of you, truly.  I just have this ailment called “I like to cook.” Without further ado —

Whole Grain Pancakes

2 c. whole wheat pastry flour (available at Health food stores, either packaged or in the bulk bins).  You can substitute other flours or combinations.  Some suggestions — half whole spelt flour and half brown rice flour, or barley/spelt, or millet/soy/spelt, or amaranth/spelt, or oat/spelt, or quinoa/spelt, or buckwheat/spelt.  Spelt is a kind of grain that can sometimes be tolerated by those who aren’t able to eat wheat.  In any case, it provides variety in your diet.  Some say it’s good to mix up your grains, meaning not eat the same thing all the time. 1 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp salt 1/4 tsp nutmeg 2 eggs, beaten well About 1-1/2 c. milk (can substitute almond, rice, soy, hemp, etc.)  Note:  You may need a little more or less liquid than 1-1/2 cups (you can use water, too) for making the perfect thick batter. The amount of liquid you need depends on whatever type of flour you are using, so put in a cup, and then keep adding to the dry ingredients until it’s just right. DIRECTIONS: Mix wet ingredients together.  Mix dry ingredients in a separate bowl.  Pour together and mix JUST until dry ingredients are incorporated.  Do not over mix.  Small lumps in the batter are just fine. Use a small measuring cup with a long handle to dip out the desired amount of batter for each pancake. Cook on a pre-heated griddle or thick-bottomed frying pan or non-stick skillet until one side bubbles through.  Turn over and cook the other side.  If the pan is the right temp, this cooking process will go pretty quickly.  For regular skillets, you may need to add a little butter for browning/not sticking. Keep completed pancakes on a platter in a warm oven (lowest setting) until you have enough to serve. Also have your stack of serving plates in the oven so they are warm and ready. To serve, take a a warm plate from the oven arrange a small stack on the plate.  Top pancakes with pat of butter, fruit, nuts, or whatever your heart desires. Use Grade B maple syrup.  Forget the fake stuff — Mrs. Whoever’s pancake topping  that passes for syrup.   :–)  Trust me, it’s not worth your while.   Once you taste Grade B maple syrup, chances are you’ll never go back.  Ask anyone from Vermont, the maple syrup state. If you don’t find Grade B maple syrup in your local Trader Joe’s, or your health food store, you can get it online.  Here’s one example of where to buy it.   Prices and shipping vary a great deal, so look around.

   

Whole Grain Pancakes with Over-Easy Egg

Have an over-easy egg or scrambled eggs on the side for extra protein.  Plain yogurt is also a good side. You can freeze the extra pancakes by layering with plastic wrap (so they don’t stick together).  Then put the whole stack or two in a freezer zip lock.  You can enjoy one or two at a time during the week when you are hankering for a quick and delicious breakfast and don’t have time to make fresh pancakes.  Thaw (overnight on the counter works fine) to room temperature. Reheat briefly in a toaster or in a non-stick pan (turn several times)  just until warmed through.  Easy peasy!

Enjoy your whole grain pancakes!

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Ezekiel Crust Vegetable Pizza and Raw Salad with Ginger

Ezekiel Crust Vegetable Pizza & Raw Salad with Ginger

Eat More Vegetables on Pizza

Do you need to eat more vegetables?  Do you want your kids to eat more vegetables?  This idea is much easier than, say, deep-frying broccoli!  As far as I’m concerned, eating pizza is a good way to eat more vegetables. I realize that’s not really the all-American point of view about pizza!  But I can’t even remember the last time I ate a meat lovers or pepperoni pizza.  It’s delicious, I’m sure.  It’s just not my thing. I’m more excited about asparagus or kale or goat cheese on my pizza. Ok, I’m weird. So how does one DO THIS you say???  Here’s one simple idea, just to give a clue about how to make a quick and easy vegetable pizza. You start with any kind of small tortilla.  Sprouted, flour, corn, kamut, rice, spelt —  whatever you like. The key is don’t use a huge one (like a big burrito size tortilla) because it will most likely be unwieldy.  Too hard to eat.  Floppy and sloppy.  But…in a pinch, you can roll it, fold it over, etc.  Actually, it will taste so good, you won’t care how it gets into your mouth! My personal favorite is Ezekiel tortillas  because they have some “body” and they come in two sizes.  Small and large.  The small ones work better. Smear Trader Joe’s Pizza Sauce over each tortilla (or somebody’s pizza sauce.)  When my cupboards were bare, I have been known to resort to a glass of good red wine salsa (might need to drain it just a bit, save the juice for the salad dressing) or simple fresh tomato slices on the bottom layer.  All of them work. Add steamed leftover vegetables — say cauliflower (sliced or crumbled a bit) this time.  Add a few slices or small chunks of fresh tomatoes, roasted garlic (leftover from making a baked chicken), small dollups of heavenly Chevre goat cheese, a sprinkle of feta (it’s salty — nice contrast), and a few chopped green onions.  Sprinkle lightly with Penzey’s Pizza Seasoning and bake at 425 or 450 degrees until it browns a little and barely bubbles.  Add a salad of any kind and you’re done. Get the idea? Here is the combination I made last night for dinner.  You can see that the variations are endless. And with my kind of pizza, the least important emphasis (meaning what fills you up)  is the crust — the crust is really a vegetable delivery system! Need more vegetables in your diet? This could work!

Ezekiel Crust Vegetable Pizza and Raw Salad with Ginger

You need: 1. Small Ezekiel Tortillas (or any small tortilla) for the number of people you’re serving.  Usually 2 small (or 1 larger size) per person. 2. Leftover cooked vegetables. I had eggplant/tomato/basil/green pepper/red onion that I had used as a side dish.  Sometimes I just have leftover broccoli or asparagus or cauliflower.  Once I even put parsnips on a pizza.  I have to tell you, it was fabulous. 3. Fresh, raw vegetables. I had rainbow chard, leftover marinated tomatoes, green onions, red cabbage.  Chop everything fairly small.  It works better. 4. Cheese. I had this variety available:  Cream cheese with olives (leftover appetizer), fontina, cheddar, 2 slices of fresh mozzarella (that was in with the marinated tomatoes) and parmesan.  Use combinations you enjoy.  Opposites work great — like soft and creamy goat cheese or cream cheese or mozzarella with salty parmesan.  Use less cheese than you think.  It needs a suggestion of cheese.  It doesn’t have to be covered in cheese to be delicious.  Not at all.  The cheese should accent the vegetables, not smother them. Use a variety of ingredients, but don’t overload the pizza. Assemble pizzas on a pizza stone or cookie sheet.  Bake at 425 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes or until cheese is soft and melted.

Raw Salad with Ginger

Raw Salad with Ginger

GRATE THE FOLLOWING raw vegetables IN WHATEVER PROPORTIONS YOU ENJOY:
Carrots
Turnips
Red Cabbage
Golden Beets
Fresh Ginger ( to taste).  Peel a small chunk and either grate it or cut small slivers off the peeled chunk.   I like actual small pieces of ginger in this salad, so that the flavor surprises and delights.   “Adding a kick” is a good way to warm up a fall/winter salad.

Dressing

A good rule of thumb is to use about a tsp of vinegar and a tsp of olive oil per serving.  For this salad, you don’t need much dressing.  You just need enough liquid for the flavors to begin to mix.  So for 4 people, you’d need a generous Tablespoon of olive oil, a generous Tablespoon of Bragg’s Cider Vinegar.  Add the salt and pepper. Taste it.  If you like more dressing, add more of each.
Bragg’s Apple Cider Vinegar
Olive Oil
Salt and fresh ground pepper

Enjoy your Ezekiel Crust Vegetable Pizza and Raw Salad with Ginger, and get more vegetables in your diet for you and your kids!

Ezekiel Crust Vegetable Pizza and Raw Salad with Ginger

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Homemade and Impossibly Good REAL Hot Chocolate

Hot Chocolate

Homemade Hot Chocolate

You can use nut milk, soy, goat or cow’s milk.  Put about a cup of milk and 1 T. of Penzey’s Dutch chocolate powder (you can always add more) in a blender.  This kind of cocoa powder doesn’t blend all that well with liquid without a little help. I know it’s an extra step, but worth it in the end. You can order the cocoa powder from Penzey’s or buy your favorite brand in the store.  I find that Penzey’s products are much fresher. Sweeten with honey or agave (low glycemic sweetener) to taste  — try 1 T. Do not microwave (anything, ever…) but put it on the stove over medium heat and stir constantly, just until heated through. This is extraordinarily delicious.  You’ll never go back to prepared mixes once you taste THIS Hot Chocolate. The secret ingredient is Penzey’s cocoa powder.  Cheers! Continue Reading

Intimacy Is Everywhere

Hello Everyone,

Today, intimacy.

Love to you all,

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Friday Love: Bam! Gate Breaking, Anyone?

Good Friday, Everyone!

Today, I’m sharing a story about how I accidentally accomplished something on my bucket list. I ran through an exit gate while looking the other way. The hood of my car is scratched up, and one windshield wiper is a mess, but let’s have a good laugh about how we never expect what “getting what we want” includes!

Let me know if you relate…

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Enough with the Name-Calling

It seems to be a growing fad these days to call someone a narcissist, or declare they are toxic.
 
Political name-calling is similar—we assign politicians and voters to categories, and brush them off as if they are unintelligent, inferior, or even worthless.
 
By labeling others, we miss their humanity. We gloss over their struggle, their best effort at dealing with life. We dismiss them.
 
We do to them what we believe they are doing to others.
 
Look past a label, and in the soft light of day, there stands a person like you or like me, coping as best they can. At the end of the day, no friend, parent, or lover making conscious choices intends to be mean, or to ignore, or to embellish. There is always more to the story.
 
If we label others, then for sure we label ourselves. We trap ourselves into believing we are less than. Or not enough. Or we don’t give ourselves the time and forgiveness to work through our “stuff.” Maybe, if we stopped accusing others of narcissism, we could forgive ourselves for those moments when we were narrow-minded, inconsiderate, or afraid.
 
When it comes to labels, nobody wins.
 
So, my dear people, I suggest we peer a little deeper into ourselves to investigate a need to separate ourselves from others by tacking them with a label filled with disdain or scorn.
 
It is my wish that you view this video and take it to heart.
 
Much love,
Terri
 
 

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Terri Crosby

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