Go Ahead. Give Yourself A High Five For Your Slip Slide.

Written by Terri Crosby for In Care of Relationships

“Self-inquiry is a spiritually induced form of wintertime. It’s not about looking for a right answer so much as stripping away and letting you see what is not necessary, what you can do without, what you are without your leaves.”

Adyashanti

Not everything moves in a noticeably positive direction all the time.  (right…) Not everything works smoothly or looks like it’s progressing. (not even!) Growth doesn’t always feel good.  (I’ve noticed that…) There are times I swear I’ve regressed.  (sigh…)   The thing is, you can’t really go backwards. Ever. (Please convince me of this, you say?) You may think an old thought, or say the same words, or find yourself in a familiar feeling not-so-great situation, but you aren’t in that situation from a place of past awareness.  You’re understanding the same old situation from a new vantage point every time!ice skating Ahhh!  The key! Give yourself a high five! In a moment of judgment, blame, anger or some other non-yummy feeling  I sometimes I say to myself, “Gee, I feel really unevolved.”  Sometimes it makes me laugh. And in that moment, I do feel a little surprised about my unloving thoughts.  But I’m glad that a judgment about someone or myself comes up and sits center stage long enough for me to say, “Well, look at that!  That’s totally crazy to think that!” And it’s true.  Thinking badly about yourself or anyone else is really nuts.  It doesn’t make any valid sense. My friend Julie Rust is a wonderful musician, singer, mom, and all around warm and talented human being.  She records Audible Insights, her own encouraging words set to music. Julie is a gentle  antidote to backsliding, slip-sliding — she’s all about giving yourself room to move. Here’s what Julie says about her most recent recording:

“When my daughter was upset about something, I said a little prayer, asking for Spirit’s help so that I could ease her mind with love and clarity. ‘What can I say so she’ll understand?’ I stopped, and listened. And then my head turned toward a vase of roses. I had my answer….”

Check out Julie’s I min 18 second recording here. Julie’s voice purrs.  You’ll notice that if you listen to her.  She’s good medicine. So when you’re after yourself or someone else for a perceived transgression, or you slide back to where you think you’ve been, do as Julie says —  be like the rose. And how’s your rosey-ness this week?  Do tell!

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For more information about In Care of Relationships, click here.

About Terri Crosby — I live in the Blue Ridge Mountains with Eric, my partner of 14 years, two cats and a dog, and as many flowers and vegetables as I can plant.  I love really good food, good friends, good relationships!

 

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Terri Crosby

Helping you create life-affirming, ever-evolving, happier relationships with those you love. Follow me on twitter at@TerriCrosby or read myblog.

Comments (4)

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    shiner

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    Yes Julie Purrs, I listened to several clips besides the rose. Thanks for reminding me of her voice and her wisdom.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Geri

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      What profound words….”Be like a rose”….I must remember that!!!!

      Reply

      • Avatar

        Terri Crosby

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        Perrrrfect words for you, the florist! :–)

        Reply

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